BREED: Quarter Horse
PRICE: Sold
DOB: 2000
LOCATION: Las Cruces, New Mexico

Disposition: Gentle beginners horse 


Listed: 09/01/2014

Rudy

Gilding

Abilities: Trail, Mountains, Hunting, Packing

Sire: n/a

Dam: n/a

Color: Sorrel

Height: 14 Hands

Berber warriors mounted on their Barb horses which are noted for their stamina. All Barb horse varieties, to include the Algerian, Tunisian, and Moroccan, originated in Northern Africa. Although their numbers are decreasing, there are some organization who are making an effort to preserve the breed. Some will argue that the Barb was sent to Spain after the invasion by the Moors and were used to breed with the Spanish horse to develop the Andalusian and Lusitano. Therefore, we get the name "Spanish Barb" to identify the horses that were brought over to the New World by the conquistadors. What ever the truth is of the Spanish mustang's origination, the Barb horse is considered to have influenced the development of the American Quarter Horse, Thoroughbred, Standardbred, Paso Fino, Criollo, and as some claim the mustang of the Americas.

Stallion
BREED: Mescal Mustang
PRICE: Not for sale
DOB: 02/26/2010
LOCATION: Las Cruces, New Mexico

Foundation Stud for breeding Mescal Mustangs

Listed: 12/01/2015

Richard Alaniz

Peach de Mescal

Captured: White Tail, Mescalero

Capture date: Jan. 2010

Sire: n/a

Dam: n/a

Color: Bay

Height: 13.2 hands

Brands: Bow & Arrow - Lt Ft shoulder

TC (Todd Chico) - Rear hind quarter

  Spanish Barb 


There are a few theories as to the root of the Spanish Barb horse, and some might argue the term is a misnomer. The original horse from Spain is an Iberian horse from the Iberian Peninsula known today as Spain and Portugal. In 711 A.D. the Moors from Northern Africa, a medieval Muslim people described as Arabs and Berbers, invaded the Iberian Peninsula and called that area Al-Andalus. The invasion was due to centuries of conflict and differences between Christians and Muslims. Coming specifically from Morocco, located in Northern Africa, the Moors crossed the Strait of Gibraltar to enter the Iberian Peninsula and as one theory claims by foot or boat. The reason was the Moors felt the horses of Spain were superior to their Barb horses, therefore, as they fought they would capture and use the Spanish horses, which today would be referred to as Andalusian horses.  As the Moors conquered the area and eventually used Spanish horses to defeat the inhabitants of that region they continued the Spanish breeding practices of these superior horses during their occupation of Spain. With time, the Iberian horse was shipped to various countries as prize horses for dignitaries throughout Europe as well as breeding perhaps a few with their Barb horses in Northern Africa. After the Spaniards took their country back in the late 15th century the Spaniards were exploring and colonizing various countries to include the Americas.


     It was the famous explorer and conquistador Juan Ponce de Leon (1474 - 1521) who in 1493 was one of 1,200 men who joined Christopher Columbus' second voyage to the New World where Ponce de Leon eventually became Governor of modern day Puerto Rico. He led the first expedition to an area that he named La Florida.  On his second voyage to modern day Florida he established a colony and brought various livestock such as cattle, sheep, and the first 50 horses known to the Americas and are now identified as the Spanish Colonial Horse.  Some researchers argue these first horses were the Iberian or what we call today the Andalusian horse. For some reason today these horses are popularly referred as the "Spanish Barb". The Colonial Spanish Horse, which encompasses all horses in the lineage of the original Spanish horses (Iberian) and eventually escaped into the wild, was one of stamina, 13.2 to 15 hands, intelligent, and with good ability in working cattle. With this in mind, the first "cowboys" in America were in Florida not Texas as many would believe.




















     Today the Barb horse from North Africa is rare in America, however the pure "Spanish Barb" or rather Spanish Colonial Horse is among a few herds in America that managed to not mix with domesticated horses that were set free and eventually interbred. Most Bureau of Land Management (BLM)mustangs are referred to as "feral" horses that live in the wild, however not all mustangs meet the confirmation standards of the authentic Spanish mustang as one can see the confirmation of various other breeds within the herds wearing a BLM freeze brand on their necks. Horses who's ancestors were never domesticated or lived in captivity post conquistador colonization are considered "true" authentic Spanish mustangs.


     According to some researchers the Romero family in Mexico have been breeding the Spanish Barb since 1800 of which some of their horses found themselves in the U.S. There are four general areas in the U. S. to my knowledge that one can find Spanish mustangs roaming freely, one of which I claim where my stock comes from. These four areas are known to have negotiated the test of time to secure a pure strain of original Spanish mustangs due to isolation in confined areas, and they are the Wilbur-Cruce Mission Strain in Arizona, the Kigar strain in southeastern Oregon, the Sulfur Springs Mustangs in southwestern Oragon, and the Mescalero Apache Mustang in southeastern New Mexico mountain range within the Mescalero Apache Reservation. My mares are exclusively chosen from the wild herds of the "White Tail" area of the Mescalero Apache Reservation. When captured, these Apache mustangs are given a "Bow & Arrow" brand on their left lower shoulder to signify an authentic Mescalero Apache Mustang.


     I argue that it is quite possible that horses were also brought to the Americas through the Bering Strait located between Russia and Alaska and could possibly be ancient Mongolian horses. During my apprenticeship as a shaman I was told by my medicine teacher that he noticed while watching a documentary on Mongolians that some of their artifacts and traditional shamanic practice were similar to the Apache way. I also noticed that some Mongolians could pass easily for Native Americans, and I noticed the gate of my Mescalero Apache Mustang mare's lope is very similar to what I term "rabbit hop" lope of the modern Mongolian horse. We must not exclude any possibilities or our observations and inquiries when we come to conclusions of the lineage of our wild horses of the Americas.


                                      

      Broodmare
BREED: Mescalero Apache Mustang
PRICE: $4,000
DOB: 2006
LOCATION: Las Cruces

New Mexico


Listed: 01/01/2015

Elmira de Mescal
Sire: Jack Daniels

Dam: Peach de Mescal

Color: Bay

Height: n/a

Training: Halter Broke, Ground work

Imprinted at birth

Photo: Elmira at 1 year 8 months old

Comanche Creek Mustang Ranch

10050 Black Hills Rd., Las Cruces, New Mexico

Phone: 575.636.7238        balikinstitute@hotmail.com

Richard Alaniz      owner/trainer

BREED: Black & White
Tobiano Paint
PRICE: Not for sale
DOB: 1996
LOCATION: Las Cruces, New Mexico


Listed: 01/01/2015

Mescal Spanish Mustangs


During my early twenties I spent many summers on the Mescalero Apache Reservation. Half my time was spent with medicine people as an apprentice shaman and the other half I was horseback chasing wild mustangs with Apache cowboys who I still remain friends with thirty-six years to this day. I was in awe of the mustang's stamina and hardiness in surviving the elements of the cold winters of the Sierra Blanca Mountains. There is nothing more exciting and beautiful than to watch a herd of wild horses run free and untamed in vast country that they have called "home" for centuries.


     In 2009 I had an idea to breed a mustang that was not only beautiful, but also disease-resistant for ease of care, hardy in all elements, sure-footed, and easy to mount.  Most of all, my idea was to help preserve the wild mustang, its history, and old western culture that comes with it. My close friend Todd Chico, a Mescalero Apache cowboy, had a small herd of untrained wild Apache mustangs from the White Tail area located in the back country of the Apache reservation. I hand picked one mare with close scrutiny for confirmation, soft eyes, full mane, and in a Bay color. After roping the mare and loading her into my stock trailer I hauled her back to my ranch in Las Cruces and began my relationship with her. Using natural horseman training techniques I started my mare which I named "Peach de Mescal", and embarked on her first ride under saddle only after three days of training with no bucking or resistance from her. With a continued training program and with time, I eventually made her a "kid horse" where any level of rider from beginner to expert could enjoy riding this once-wild mustang. 


     My next step was to find a suitable stallion to breed with Peach. My friend Joe Sanchez recently purchased a Spanish Barb, "Jack Daniels" (J.D. for short), originally from Mexico then was eventually transported to New Mexico. With a long, wavy mane and a strong build I saw the potential in J.D. and decided to breed him with my Apache mare to see what I could get. The first foal was "Jake Spoon de Mescal" a stud colt who is a beautiful Dark Bay horse with a sound confirmation, large dark hooves, large soft eyes, small head, and a full, long, wavy main and tail characteristic of the Spanish horses. I was extremely impressed as well as other horse people who saw what I developed. Soon afterwards, word was getting around as to how good looking my new mustang Jake looked in beauty and confirmation.  I decided to breed  the same pair again, and my second foal from J. D. and Peach is "Elmira de Mescal", a 2014 Bay mare. In my opinion I was very successful in what I wanted to create, and the name I gave this new breed of mustang was "Mescal Spanish Mustangs". I will promote this breed as I continue to hand select Mescalero Apache mares for my primary stud "Jake Spoon de Mescal".  Primary colors of the Mescal Spanish Mustang will be Bay and Dark Bay colors. Buckskin, Grulla, and other colors are by request when mares of a specific color are available and meet our breeding standards.  Average size of our mustangs will be 14 to 14.2 hands, "A" frame chest, with a full, long, and wavy mane and tail, dark strong hooves, and proportional head to body.

Our Mares

Sancho

Gilding

Abilities: Trail, Mountains, Hunting

Sire: n/a

Dam: n/a

Color: Bay

Height: 14.2 Hands



Mustang Breeding - Training - Sales


Naki

Gilding

Abilities: Trail, Mountains, Hunting

Sire: n/a

Dam: n/a

Color: Red Marbled

Height: 14.2 Hands



Jake Spoon de Mescal

Standing at: Comanche Creek Ranch

Stud Fee: $500


Sire: Jack Daniels

Dam: Peach de Mescal

Color: Dark Bay

Height: 14.1 hands

BREED: Mustang
PRICE: Sold
DOB: 2001
LOCATION: Las Cruces, New Mexico



Listed: 09/01/2013

Our Stallions                                      Mustang History listed below           

Stallion
BREED: Mescal Mustang
PRICE: Not for sale
DOB: 02/26/2011
LOCATION: Las Cruces,

New Mexico


Listed: 12/022014

Jack Daniels
Foundation Stallion

Stud Fee: $500


Breed: Spanish Barb - Mexico 

Height: 14.2

Color: Dark Bay

Stallion
BREED: Spanish Barb
PRICE: Not for sale
DOB: 2006
LOCATION: La Cruces,

New Mexico


Listed: 12/022014

History

          Mare
BREED: Mescal Mustang
PRICE: $2,000
DOB: 02/26/2014
LOCATION: Las Cruces, New Mexico



Listed: 01/01/2015

Wayne "Spoody" Enjady Jr.,  with Mescalero Apache Mustang Stallion "Spice" on the Apache Reservation

BREED: Appaloosa
PRICE: Sold
DOB: 2001
LOCATION: Las Cruces, New Mexico



Listed: 09/01/2013

July Johnson

Gilding

Abilities: Trail, Mountains, Hunting

Sire: n/a

Dam: n/a

Color: Black & White

Height: 14.2 Hands